The Ohio State University Computational Math Seminar

Thursday at 1:50-2:45 PM (unless otherwise noted)

Hybrid format: either virtually or in Math Tower Room 154 (See below for details)

For questions, contact Dr. Yulong Xing or Dr. Dongbin Xiu, Email: xing dot 205@osu.edu or xiu dot 16@osu.edu



Year 2022-2023 Schedule

DATE and TIME  Location  SPEAKER  TITLE 
September 15 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Wenlong Pei 
(OSU) 
The Search for Time Accuracy: A Variable Time-stepping Algorithm for Computational Fluid Dynamics 
October 6 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Yue Yu 
(Lehigh) 
Learning Neural Operators for Complex Physical System Modeling 
October 20 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Michael Saunders 
(Stanford Univ.) 
Cancelled  
November 3 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Di Fang 
(UC Berkeley) 
Quantum algorithms for Hamiltonian simulation with unbounded operators 
November 10 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Qing Nie 
(UCI) 
Multiscale spatiotemporal reconstruction of single-cell genomics data 
November 17 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Jesse Chan 
(Rice Univ.) 
Constructing robust high order entropy stable discontinuous Galerkin methods 
December 1 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
Math Tower 154
Maria Han Veiga 
(Univ. Michigan) 
High fidelity numerical codes: structure-preserving schemes with data-driven models 
March 30 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
TBD
Guannan Zhang 
(Oak Ridge National Lab) 
TBD 
April 13 
Thursday, 1:50pm 
In person 
TBD
Qin Li 
(Univ. Wisconsin) 
TBD 
April 18 
Tuesday, 1:50pm 
In person 
TBD
Zheng Sun 
(Univ. Alabama) 
TBD 



Abstracts:

September 15
Wenlong Pei
Title: The Search for Time Accuracy: A Variable Time-stepping Algorithm for Computational Fluid Dynamics

Dahlquist, Liniger, and Nevanlinna proposed a two-step time-stepping scheme for systems of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) in 1983. The little-explored variable time-stepping scheme has advantages in numerical simulations for its fine properties such as unconditional G-stability and second-order accuracy. We simplify its implementation through time filters (pre-filter and post-filter) on a certain first-order implicit method. The adaptivity algorithm for this variable time-stepping scheme, highly reducing computation cost as well as keeping time accuracy, has been applied to systems of ODEs and flow models. Moreover we have applied this method to Navier Stokes equations for stability and error analysis.

October 6
Yue Yu
Title: Learning Neural Operators for Complex Physical System Modeling

For many decades, physics-based PDEs have been commonly employed for modeling complex system responses, then traditional numerical methods were employed to solve the PDEs and provide predictions. However, when governing laws are unknown or when high degrees of heterogeneity present, these classical models may become inaccurate. In this talk we propose to use data-driven modeling which directly utilizes high-fidelity simulation and experimental measurements to learn the hidden physics and provide further predictions. In particular, we develop PDE-inspired neural operator architectures, to learn the mapping between loading conditions and the corresponding system responses. By parameterizing the increment between layers as an integral operator, our neural operator can be seen as the analog of a time-dependent autonomous nonlocal equation, which captures the long-range dependencies in the feature space and is guaranteed to be resolution-independent. Moreover, when applying to (hidden) PDE solving tasks, our neural operator provides a universal approximation to a fixed point iterative procedure, and partial physical knowledge can be incorporated to further improve the model’s generalizability and transferability. As an application, we learn the material models directly from digital image correlation (DIC) displacement tracking measurements on a porcine tricuspid valve leaflet tissue, and show that the learnt model substantially outperforms conventional constitutive models.

November 3
Di Fang
Title: Quantum algorithms for Hamiltonian simulation with unbounded operators

Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in developing and analyzing quantum computing algorithms for quantum dynamics simulation of bounded operators (Hamiltonian simulation). However, many scientific and engineering problems require the efficient treatment of unbounded operators, which frequently arise due to the discretization of differential operators. Such applications include molecular dynamics, electronic structure theory, quantum control and quantum machine learning. We will introduce some recent advances in quantum algorithms for efficient unbounded Hamiltonian simulation, including Trotter type splitting and the quantum highly oscillatory protocol (qHOP) in the interaction picture. The latter yields a surprising superconvergence result for regular potentials. (The talk does not assume a priori knowledge on quantum computing.)

November 10
Qing Nie
Title: Multiscale spatiotemporal reconstruction of single-cell genomics data

Cells make fate decisions in response to dynamic environments, and multicellular structures emerge from multiscale interplays among cells and genes in space and time. The recent single-cell genomics technology provides an unprecedented opportunity to profile cells. However, those measurements are taken as static snapshots of many individual cells that often lose spatial information. How to obtain temporal relationships among cells from such measurements? How to recover spatial interactions among cells, such as cell-cell communication? In this talk I will present our newly developed computational tools that dissect transition properties of cells and infer cell-cell communication based on nonspatial single-cell genomics data. In addition, I will present methods to derive multicellular spatiotemporal pattern from spatial transcriptomics datasets. Through applications of those methods to systems in development and regeneration, we show the discovery power of such methods and identify areas for further development for spatiotemporal reconstruction of single-cell genomics data.

November 17
Jesse Chan
Title: Constructing robust high order entropy stable discontinuous Galerkin methods

High order methods are known to be unstable when applied to nonlinear conservation laws whose solutions exhibit shocks and turbulence. Entropy stable schemes address this instability by ensuring that physically relevant solutions satisfy a semi-discrete entropy inequality independently of numerical resolution or solution regularization and shock capturing. In this talk, we will review different approaches for constructing robust entropy stable discontinuous Galerkin methods and discuss the impact of different discretization choices on robustness for under-resolved compressible flows.

December 1
Maria Han Veiga
Title: High fidelity numerical codes: structure-preserving schemes with data-driven models

Many engineering and scientific problems can be described by equations of fluid dynamics, namely, systems of time dependent nonlinear hyperbolic PDEs. The mathematical description of these processes as well as the numerical discretisation of the resulting PDEs will depend on the level of detail required to study them. In this talk I will focus on two directions towards higher fidelity numerical simulations: first, I present a novel structure-preserving arbitrarily high-order method that solves the nonlinear ideal magneto-hydrodynamics equations. Secondly, I will focus on our work using Machine Learning (ML) methods with the aim to improve or speed up numerical simulations, through the development of parameter-free routines as part of a numerical solver or surrogate models, with the goal of creating hybrid simulation pipelines that can improve over time.


Year 2021-2022 Seminar

Year 2019-2020 Seminar


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